Organizational structure

The Campaign is entirely non-profit and independent of all groupings inside and outside Sri Lanka. It is run by a Board of Directors drawn from its Council of Advisors. The Campaign is supported by a dedicated group of volunteers, who are coordinated by the Campaign Director.  All members of the board and council are unpaid and all support the Campaign in their personal capacities to maintain its independence.

You can find out more about how we are funded by looking at the accounts for our last financial year.


Council of Advisors

The Campaign is supported by a Council of Advisors. These influential figures come from all walks of life and regions of the world and support the Campaign’s three main objectives: effective humanitarian relief, human rights for all and a lasting peace in Sri Lanka based on justice and reconciliation.  Our advisors use their links with the media and with other opinion-formers to push forward the campaign demands, as well as providing a sounding board for the Campaign’s work.


Board of Directors

The Campaign’s decision-making body is its Board of Directors, which is drawn from its Council of Advisors. The Board decides on the Campaign’s organisational structure, overall objectives and programme of work. The Campaign Director is an ex-officio member of the board but does not have a vote.

The board consists of:

  • Edward Mortimer (chair)
  • Carolyn Hayman (secretary)
  • Allan Marson
  • Lucy Popescu

Volunteers

The day-to-day activities of the Campaign are carried out by a dedicated team of volunteers and interns, drawn from a variety of ethnic and professional backgrounds. None are paid.

 

Staff

The Sri Lanka Campaign currently employ two members of staff:

  • Fred Carver – Campaign Director
  • Richard Gowing – Deputy Director

Staff

Fred Carver

Fred Carver

Campaign Director

“Sri Lanka is heading towards an avoidable catastrophe. If we can persuade the Government of Sri Lanka in time that peace will only last if it is built upon a foundation of justice and respect for human rights then there is no reason why Sri Lanka cannot put ethnic violence and division firmly in its past. But the path that the Government of Sri Lanka is walking leads to totalitarianism, and will inevitably lead back to war.”

 

Fred Carver - Full Biography
is the Campaign Director of the Sri Lanka Campaign for Peace and Justice.

Before that he had a career in electoral campaigning and local government. He came to the Sri Lanka Campaign for Peace and Justice after a period spent studying the politics of South Asia and writing articles, both on statebuilding and human rights in a South Asian context and issues of accountability and democracy more widely. Before starting in his current role he spent time in Sri Lanka talking to victims of torture and arbitrary detention and their families.


Richard Gowing

Richard Gowing

Deputy Director

“Truth, justice, acknowledgement and compensation – these are the demands of victims and survivors of Sri Lanka’s civil war. Unless heard, genuine reconciliation and a sustainable peace will remain illusory. It is the Sri Lanka Campaign’s goal to help ensure that they are listened to and acted upon.”

Richard Gowing - Full Biography
is the Deputy Director of the Sri Lanka Campaign for Peace and Justice.

 

 

He holds an MSc in International Development and Humanitarian Emergencies from the London School of Economics where he graduated with Distinction. He currently also works at the Chatham House US Project


The Board of Directors

Edward Mortimer CMG

Edward Mortimer CMG

Chair of the Board of Directors and the Advisory Council

“I don’t want yet again to be wringing my hands, in a few months or years, about something close to ethnic cleansing or genocidal war crimes that we failed to investigate or prevent while there was still time.”

Edward Mortimer - Full Biography

is a Distinguished Fellow of All Souls College, Oxford, Senior Programme Adviser to the Salzburg Global Seminar, and Chair of the Sri Lanka Campaign.

From 1998 to 2006 he served as chief speechwriter and (from 2001) as director of communications to UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan. He has spent much of his career as a journalist, first with The Times of London, where he developed an expertise in Middle East affairs, and later with the Financial Times, where from 1987 to 1998 he was the main commentator and columnist on foreign affairs. From 2007 to 2011 he was Senior Vice-President and Chief Programme Officer at the Salzburg Global Seminar.

Mr. Mortimer has also served as a fellow and/or faculty at several institutions, including the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, the International Institute of Strategic Studies, and (as Honorary Professor) the University of Warwick; and on the governing bodies of several non-governmental organizations, including Chatham House, the Institute of War and Peace Reporting, the John Stuart Mill Institute, the 21st Century Trust, Minority Rights Group International, the Agence France-Presse Foundation and the Children’s Radio Foundation. He is President of the British Association of Former UN Civil Servants.


Carolyn Hayman OBE

Carolyn Hayman OBE

Company Secretary, Board Member and Advisor

“I have been shocked to see friends from Sri Lanka become increasingly intimidated and silenced over the last few years. The whole world should be concerned that the seeds of the next conflict are being sown right now.”

Carolyn Hayman - Full Biography

is a specialist in conflict resolution and peace-making and has direct experience of building coalitions for peace in Sudan.  After a brief career in the UK civil service, Carolyn has focused on supporting innovation and startups in the private and not for profit sector. She was a Board member of the Commonwealth Development Corporation from 1994 to 1999, is a former member of the Quaker UN Office (Geneva) Committee, and received an OBE in 2003.


Allan Marson

Allan Marson

Board Member

Allan Marson - Full Biography

left Goldman Sachs in 2010 to pursue other interests. He had been based in Singapore for the previous 10 years, and responsible for the commodities business in Asia. Prior to that, Allan worked at GS in London, and at BP Oil.

Allan now divides time between family, business and not for profits work. He is particularly interested in matters relating to human rights, minority rights, and the consequences of conflict. This interest has drawn him to Sri Lanka. He sits on the board of the John Smith Trust, and is a director of Beyond Borders Consulting in Scotland.


Lucy Popescu

Lucy Popescu

Board Member

“Sri Lanka is rated the 4th most dangerous place in the world for journalists, higher even than Afghanistan. The new peace in Sri Lanka has come at a high cost to freedom of expression and the human rights of its citizens.”

 

Lucy Popescu - Full Biography
Lucy Popescu is a writer, journalist and editor with a background in human rights, literature and theatre. For over 20 years she worked with the English Centre of PEN, the international association of writers, and was Director of its Writers in Prison Committee from 1991 to 2006. Lucy co-edited the PEN anthology, Another Sky (Profile Books, 2007). The Good Tourist, her book about human rights and ethical travel, was published by Arcadia Books in 2008. She writes a monthly column in the Literary Review about persecuted writers and journalists, reviews books, theatre and film and contributes to various publications in the UK and abroad, including The Guardian, The Independent, Independent on Sunday, Words without Borders and Tribune magazine. Lucy is a trustee of the JMK Award for theatre directors and a creative writing mentor for the Write to Life Programme at Freedom from Torture (formerly the Medical Foundation). She is an elected Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts.

Advisory Council

Sharry Aiken

Sharry Aiken

Advisory Council Member

“As a Canadian and the parent of two children with mixed Tamil/Jewish heritage, I feel a special responsibility to document the ongoing human rights catastrophe in Sri Lanka and contribute to efforts aimed at accountability and ending impunity.”

Sharry Aiken - Full Biography
is an associate professor in the faculty of law at Queen’s University where she teaches international refugee law, international human rights law and other public law courses. A past president of the Canadian Council for Refugees, Prof. Aiken currently serves as co-chair of the CCR’s Legal Affairs Committee and vice-chair of the board of directors of the Canadian Centre for International Justice Prof. Aiken travelled to Sri Lanka as a young adult and experienced the country as a fairly typical backpacker. However, many years later, her refugee law practice brought her into contact with dozens of asylum seekers from Sri Lanka, affording a very different window into the country and its problems. More recently, as an academic, Prof. Aiken has been researching the causes and consequences of asylum flows from its Tamil refugee diaspora.

Beate Arnestad

Beate Arnestad

Advisory Council Member

“There is a quote by Martin Luther King that comes in my mind with respect to all horrifying happenings in Sri Lanka: “We shall have to repent in this generation, not so much for the evil deeds of the wicked, but of the appalling silence of the good people.””

Beate Arnestad - Full Biography
is a Norwegian film maker. She has over twenty years of experience producing and directing content for both the entertainment and documentary departments at the Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation. She has worked in Egypt, Turkey, India, China, Singapore, Thailand, USA and various countries in Europe.

Her most recent documentary My Daughter the Terrorist was independently produced and filmed during the time Arnestad lived in Sri Lanka. The film is ground breaking, as no one has ever followed the Black Tigers as they prepare for a mission. My Daughter the Terrorist is currently being screened at film festivals all over the world, and has received several mentions and awards including the Centaur Award for best full-length documentary, at Message to Man in St. Petersburg. She is currently working on a film dealing with a court case at the ICTR; the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda.


Nirmanusan Balasundaram

Nirmanusan Balasundaram

Advisory Council Member

“Since ‘Independence’ consecutive governments have targeted the Tamil nation in the island of Sri Lanka to eliminate their identity. In the peak of this process destructive mechanisms had been intensified by the present regime, which has already been accused of mass atrocities including genocide against the Tamil nation. In Sri Lanka, today exists a war by other means rather than a post-conflict situation.”

Nirmanusan Balasundaram - Full Biography
is an independent journalist and human rights defender. Growing up in the war torn region of Sri Lanka, Nirmanusan has been witness to the horrendous consequences of war, with these experiences and direct knowledge providing him the ability to accurately express to the world the ground reality. He holds an MA in Peace and Conflict Studies. He has worked for the Berghof Foundation for Conflict Studies in Sri Lanka, and later worked as an independent consultant for Berghof Peace Support, Berlin, Germany. As an international election observer attached to the Asian Network for Free Elections (ANFREL) Nirmanusan observed the first election held in Aceh, Indonesia in December 2006, after the Helsinki Agreement was signed between the Gerakan Aceh Merdeka (GAM) and the Indonesian Government. In 2007 he was honored by the Universal Peace Federation of Germany with the “Ambassador for Peace” award. Nirmanusan’s writings in English can be read on his blog www.nirmanusan.blogspot.com

Adele Barker

Adele Barker

Advisory Council Member

“I believe that military victory achieves only a temporary absence of war but no real peace. What is most urgent now is that the Tamil grievances that led to this war be addressed and that a truth and reconciliation commission begins to be formed. Otherwise, I worry that the divisions on this island will become etched even deeper.”

Adele Barker - Full Biography

is Professor of Russian and Slavic Studies at the University of Arizona in Tucson, Arizona. She received her Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from New York University , studied at Moscow State University and has taught at the University of Washington in addition to the University of Arizona. She has worked with NGO’s in Russia, run government sponsored exchanges between the University of Arizona and academic institutions in Turkmenia and Kazakhstan.

She is the author or editor of five books on Russia and the Soviet Union. In 2001-2002 she spent the year as a Fulbright Senior Scholar at the University of Peradeniya in Sri Lanka. She returned to the island for two extended stays after the tsunami and has spent time in the Tamil north. Her recently published work of creative non-fiction Not Quite Paradise: An American Sojourn in Sri Lanka (Beacon Press, 2010) is part-memoir, part-travelogue of her own life on an island at war with itself. She is deeply concerned about both the physical and psychological problems faced by those who have been displaced by the tsunami and the civil war.

An audio version of Adele’s book not quite paradise can be downloaded from Audible:

Not Quite Paradise (US)

Not Quite Paradise (UK)


Lakhdar Brahimi

Lakhdar Brahimi

Advisory Council Member

“I respect and admire much of what Sri Lanka has done and represent in the Third World and the Non Aligned Movement. Their Government won the war against the LTTE and that is good. They now urgently need to win the peace on behalf and for the benefit of all the people of Sri Lanka. To that end, international support and cooperation should be sought, not resisted.”

Lakhdar Brahimi - Full Biography

is former Foreign Minister of Algeria, Ambassador and international diplomat. Negotiated the end of civil war in Lebanon on behalf of the League of Arab States; led several UN Peace Operations, notably in South Africa, Haiti, Afghanistan , Iraq . Chaired the Independent Commission set up in 2000 by UN Secretary General Kofi Annan which produced a report on UN Peace Operations endorsed by the Millennium Summit and widely known as “The Brahimi Report”.

Member of “The Elders” & the Global Leadership Forum; Governing Board, SIPRI; Board of Trustees, International Crisis Group and Global Humanitarian Forum.


Basil Fernando

Basil Fernando

Advisory Council Member

“I wish to underline, that what I see in Sri Lanka is a total crisis of democracy, rule of law and human rights affecting ALL not just minorities only”

Basil Fernando - Full Biography

is the Executive Director of the Asian Human Rights Commission (AHRC) and the Asian Legal Resource Centre (ALRC).

He has been active in human rights and social action issues continuously from his youth years. He graduated from the Faculty of Law of the University of Ceylon, Colombo, Sri Lanka in 1972 and practiced law from 1980 to 1989 at the Supreme Court of Sri Lanka with an emphasis in Criminal Law, Employment Law and Human Rights Law.

He was an Appeals Counsel for Vietnamese refugees in Hong Kong, for a project sponsored by the United Nation High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) from 1989 to 1992. From 1992 to 1993, he was a Senior United Nations Human Rights Officer-in-Charge of the Investigation Unit in Cambodia under the UN Transitional Authority in Cambodia (UNTAC). He was the Officer-in-Charge and the Chief of the Legal Assistance at the Cambodia Office of United Nations Center for Human Rights from 1993 to 1994. He has been the Executive Director of the AHRC and ALRC from 1994 up to the present.

He is the author and editor of several books on Human Rights related issues and legal reform issues, and has contributed many articles to academic journals and the media. He is the Chief Editor Human Rights SOLIDARITY and Editor of Article 2.

Mr. Fernando has conducted nearly 100 workshops and consultations on Reconciliation issues as well as on diverse aspects of Human Rights and Legal Reform and he was awarded the Kuwanju (Korea) Human Rights prize for 2001.


Charles Glass

Charles Glass

Advisory Council Member

“No one should stand by while human beings are herded into camps, those who expose their plight are murdered, those who try to help them are expelled and those who claim to believe in justice remain silent.”

Charles Glass - Full Biography

is an Author, journalist, and broadcaster specialising in the Middle East. Charles writes regularly for The Spectator, was ABC News chief Middle East correspondent from 1983-93, and has worked as a correspondent for Newsweek and The Observer. His work has appeared in newspapers and magazines, and on television networks, all over the world.

Glass himself made headlines in 1987, when he was taken hostage for 62 days in Lebanon by Hezbollah, the Shi’ite Muslim group, and is the only Western hostage in Lebanon known to have escaped, which he describes in his book, Tribes with Flags. In 1988, he exposed Saddam Hussein’s then-secret biological weapons program. The U.S. government rejected Glass’s claims, until Iraq invaded Kuwait in 1990. One year later, he went alone with a hidden camera to Indonesian-occupied East Timor and, despite government restrictions, filmed and filed a report on repression and torture. This report influenced a U.S. Senate committee to vote to suspend U.S. military aid to Indonesia. He has covered wars in the Middle East, Eritrea, Rhodesia, Somalia, Iraq and Bosnia-Herzegovina.

He has lectured regularly on the Middle East, American foreign policy, world journalism and human rights in the United States and Britain.


Bruce Haigh

Bruce Haigh

Advisory Council Member

“If you see the justice of the Tamil quest for equality in Sri Lanka and do nothing about it you stand  condemned.”

 

Bruce Haigh - Full Biography
is a former Australian diplomat.He served in South Africa from 1976/79 where he initiated Australian Embassy contact with members of the black South African resistance, including the Black Consciousness Movement. Included amongst the friends he made at this time were Steve Biko and Dr. Mamphela Ramphele. Bruce helped a number of political activists escape South Africa including banned newspaper editor, Donald Woods, and his role in this escape was portrayed in the film, “Cry Freedom” produced by Richard Attenborough.

Bruce has also worked in the Australian Embassy in Saudi Arabia (1982/84), was Director of the Indonesia Section (1984/86), worked in Islamabad (1986/88) when he travelled to Afghanistan to report on the war and other aspects of the Soviet occupation. In 1994, he was Deputy High Commissioner at the Australian High Commission, Colombo.

Bruce was instrumental in helping to set up the Ifa Lethu Foundation which locates, repatriates and curates South African works of art taken out of the country during the years of apartheid. He now provides regular political analysis on international and domestic issues for radio and television, conferences and writes for a number of newspapers.


Bianca Jagger

Bianca Jagger

Advisory Council Member

“The world cannot continue to ignore the suffering of the approximately 280,000 Tamil civilians, including women and – according to Amnesty International – at least 50,000 children, illegally detained in internment camps in northern Sri Lanka. The imminent monsoon will create life threatening conditions in these camps, and risks causing a humanitarian catastrophe.”

 

Bianca Jagger - Full Biography
has worked as a human rights advocate for over thirty years, campaigning in defence of human rights, civil liberties, peace, social justice and environmental protection.

She is President and Founder of the Bianca Jagger Human Rights Foundation, a Council of Europe Goodwill Ambassador, Chair of the World Future Council and Trustee of the Amazon Charitable Trust.

Jagger has been the recipient of many prestigious international awards, not least of which is the Right Livelihood Award, also known as the “alternative Nobel prize”. Others include the United Nations Earth Day International Award, the Amnesty International USA Media Spotlight Award for Leadership for her Human Rights work around the world, the World Citizenship Award from The Nuclear Age Peace Foundation, the World Achievement Award from Mikhail Gorbachev. In November 2000, Ms. Jagger received The National Association of Criminal Defence Lawyer (NACDL) Champion of Justice Award, naming her as a “steadfast and eloquent advocate for the elimination of the death penalty in America .” She holds two doctorates honoris causa: an honorary doctorate in Human Rights from Simmons College , and an honorary doctorate in Humanities from Stonehill College , Boston Massachusetts .

Bianca Jagger is a member of the Executive Director’s Leadership Council for Amnesty International USA, the Advisory Committee of Human Rights Watch America , and was a member of the Advisory Board of the Coalition for International Justice, and the Twentieth Century Task Force to Apprehend War Criminals.


Damien Kingsbury

Damien Kingsbury

Advisory Council Member

“The Eelam war in Sri Lanka resulted from an inability of the state to develop politcal equity for all its citizens, in particular its ethnic Tamils, who have for decades suffered formal and informal discrimination. The horrors of that war were perpetrated by boths sides and now it is ended. It is now the task of any government claiming to rule on behalf of all citizens to again seek political equity, rather than the imposition of the sometimes discriminatory views of the majority at the expense of the legitmate rights of the minority.”

Damien Kingsbury - Full Biography

holds a Personal Chair in the School of International and Political Studies at Deakin University. He is the author and editor of numerous books and a large number of articles on political and security matters in the South-East and South Asian region and has advised the Australian government on a range of security policy issues.

In 2005, Professor Kingsbury was advisor to the Free Aceh Movement in the historic Helsinki peace talks, in which he drafted the negotiating points and negotiated much of the final agreement, including the critical last point on local democracy. The Helsinki peace talks brought and end to almost three decades of separatist war through the introduction of regional autonomy, democratic elections and controls over the armed forces and police. In 2008, the mediator of the talks, Martti Ahtisaari, received the Nobel Peace Prize.

Professor Kingsbury is a regular contributor to and commentator for Australian and international mediator, including the BBC, Financial Times, Washington Post, Associated Press, Reuters, Australian Broadcasting Corporation, The Sydney Morning Herald, The National Times, The Age and many others.


Antony Loewenstein

Antony Loewenstein

Advisory Council Member

“The Tamil struggle for justice and self-determination is a cause that should be supported by all citizens of good faith. Like the disenfranchised Palestinians, Tamil stories should resonate around the world.”

Antony Loewenstein - Full Biography

is an independent freelance journalist, author and blogger.He has written for many Australian and international newspapers, including the Guardian, Washington Post, Haaretz and the Nation, and appears regularly around the world on radio, TV (includingDemocracy Now!), in public, writer’s festivals (in Australia and overseas) and at universities (including Harvard) discussing current affairs, politics and media.

Antony contributed a major chapter to 2004’s Australian best-seller, Not Happy, John! on the Middle East. His best-selling book on the Israel/Palestine conflict, My Israel Question, was short-listed for the 2007 New South Wales Premier’s Literary Award. He was a contributor to A Time to Speak Out: On Israel, Zionism and Jewish Identity and his second book, The Blogging Revolution is on theinternet in repressive regimes.

He writes regularly for online magazines New Matilda and Crikey, is a board member of Macquarie University’s Centre for Middle East and North African Studies and co-founder of advocacy group Independent Australian Jewish Voices. He contributed to Amnesty International Australia’s 2008 campaign about Chinese internet repression and the Beijing Olympic Games.


Jake Lynch

Jake Lynch

Advisory Council Member

“International pressure on Sri Lanka is working. Now is the time to intensify it, to bring about real negotiations over how to recognize and implement the Tamils’ legitimate right to self-determination. That is not going to go away because it is based on human needs – as long as it remains unfulfilled, the peoples of Sri Lanka will be condemned to endure a repeating cycle of violence and abuse.”

Jake Lynch - Full Biography

is Director of the Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies at the University of Sydney

He is also co-convener of its Sri Lanka Human Rights Project, an Executive Member of the Sydney Peace Foundation and an Advisor to the Toda Institute for Global Peace and Policy Research.

Following his PhD (City University, London), Jake has spent the past 12 years researching, developing, teaching and training in peace journalism – and practising it, as an experienced international reporter in television and newspapers. He was an on-air presenter, anchoring over a thousand bulletins for BBC World News; the Sydney Correspondent for the London Independent newspaper, and a Political Correspondent for Sky News.

Jake has led training workshops in peace journalism for media professionals in many countries including Indonesia, the Philippines, Nepal, Lebanon, Jordan, Palestine, Cyprus, Armenia, Georgia, Norway and the UK. Publications include several books, including the landmark Peace Journalism, and in 2008, Jake was guest editor of a special edition of the Routledge scholarly journal, Global Change, Peace and Security.

In 2009, he won a prestigious competitive grant, worth half a million dollars, from the Australian Research Council, to investigate prospects for devising a Global Standard for reporting conflict, in partnership with the International Federation of Journalists and the aid agency, Act for Peace.


Chibli Mallat

Chibli Mallat

Advisory Council Member

Chibli Mallat - Full Biography

is Presidential Professor of Law and Professor of Middle Eastern Law and Politics at the University of Utah. He also holds the EU Jean Monnet Chair of Law at St Joseph ‘s University in Lebanon. He has been tenured on three continents, and has in his academic career held teaching and research positions at a number of universities, including Princeton, Yale, Lyon, London, and Virginia. He has published over thirty books in English, French and Arabic, including the award-winning The Renewal of Islamic Law, Cambridge 1993, Introduction to Middle Eastern Law, Oxford 2007, and Iraq: Guide to Law and Policy, in press at Aspen.

As a legal practitioner and consultant, he was lead counsel in a number of international criminal law cases, including for the Sabra and Chatila victims in Belgium, for Imam Musa Sadr’s family against Mu‘ammar al-Qaddafi, and has helped set up Amnesty International’s regional office in Beirut in 2000, for which he acts as legal counsel. In 1996, he helped establish Indict, the international NGO that worked to bring Saddam Hussein and his aides to justice. He has advised several governments and governmental agencies on various legal issues, currently as Senior Legal Advisor to the Global Justice Project: Iraq. He is a frequent contributor to the media, and presently edits the Beirut Daily Star law page. In 2005, he ran the first democratic campaign for the Lebanese presidency.


Rajan Menon

Rajan Menon

Advisory Council Member

“Now is the time to settle the civil conflict in Sri Lanka, which has consumed thousands of lives and brought severe misery to countless others. In the short term, access should be provided to the UN and international relief agencies to deal with the humanitarian problems facing refugees and lists of detainees should be made available. In the long run, economic development in the war torn areas must proceed hand in hand with political measures aimed at reconciliation and empowerment.”

Rajan Menon - Full Biography

is an American foreign policy specialist

He is the Monroe J. Rathbone Professor of International Relations at Lehigh University in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania and, in August 2010, will become the Spitzer Professor in Political Science at the City College of New York/City University of New York.

His current work concerns American foreign policy; globalization; terrorism; security issues in Northeast Asia; the political and security dimensions of energy development in the Caspian Sea zone; and the comparative study of empires; and the international relations of Russia and the other post-Soviet states.

He was Senior Advisor at the Carnegie Corporation of New York for two years, where he played a key role in developing the Corporation’s “Russia Initiative.” He has also served as Senior Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations and as Director for Eurasia Policy Studies at the Seattle-based National Bureau for Asian Research (NBR). He has also served as Special Assistant for Arms Control and National Security to Congressman Stephen J. Solarz (D-NY)

He has authored or edited five books and more than 60 articles in leading academic journals and edited volumes. He writes often for the Los Angeles Times and has also written opinion pieces for Newsweek, the International Herald Tribune, Financial Times, washingtonpost.com, Christian Science Monitor, and the Chicago Tribune. He has been a commentator on the BBC, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, Australian Broadcasting Corporation, CNN, and National Public Radio.


Natalie Samarasinghe

Natalie Samarasinghe

Advisory Council Member

“What is – and isn’t – happening in Sri Lanka matters to us all. The bloodshed in 2009 and worrying developments since continue to challenge the global rallying cry of ‘never again’. The failure to investigate past and current abuses is preventing the country from moving forward; tempting others to adopt the ruthless ‘Sri Lanka model’; and undermining hard-won global standards. Sri Lanka is a test case for the international community. We failed in 2009. We must not fail again.”

Natalie Samarasinghe - Full Biography

is Executive Director of the United Nations Association – UK (UNA-UK), a UK-based charity that provides independent analysis on UN issues. She is the first woman to hold this position.

With a background in human rights, Natalie has worked for UNA-UK since 2006. Prior to joining the Association, she held various roles in the public, private and education sectors, and contributed to media in the UK and Sri Lanka. Natalie provides voluntary support to a number of NGOs, including as a Trustee of the Association for Citizenship Teaching. She edits publications on a wide range of global issues for organisations such as Witan Media and SAGE.


Teesta Setalvad

Teesta Setalvad

Advisory Council Member

Teesta Setalvad - Full Biography

is a renowned journalist and human rights activist based in Mumbai. In addition to her role as Secretary of Citizens for Justice and Peace, she is Director of KHOJ  – Education for a Plural India Programme, and Editor of Communalism Combat, as well as Advisory Consultant to the International Centre for Transitional Justice, New York and South Africa.

In her career as journalist since 1983, Teesta has written for a number of papers, including the Business India. Her film credits include ‘Bombay – a Myth Shattered’ on the 1993 Bombay riots. She has received many awards for journalism, including the Prince Claus Award 2000 (Netherlands) for Communalism Combat, and  the Chameli Devi Jain Award for Outstanding Woman Journalist  1993 for her coverage of the riots.

Teesta has a strong interest in the role of curricula in reinforcing or combating inter-communal stereotyping, and served, among many other roles, as a member of the Central Advisory Board of Education (CABE) for the Government of India. Her advocacy has extended also to the protection of rights on minorities, Dalits and women, and judicial and police reform.


Yasmin Sooka

Yasmin Sooka

Advisory Council Member

“Reconciliation in Sri Lanka can only be built on Truth, Justice and accountability. 

Reports of continued intimidation of media and human rights defenders amid extrajudicial killings, continued disappearances, abductions and deteriorating rule of law make the Sri Lanka Campaign’s objectives more urgent.

I believe that unless allegations of war crimes are addressed through a truth seeking mechanism and/or an independent commission or criminal investigation which places victims at the centre of the process, reconciliation will continue to elude Sri Lanka.”

Yasmin Sooka - Full Biography

is the Executive Director of the Foundation for Human Rights in South Africa. She is one of three co-authors of the April 2011 Panel of Experts’ report on Sri Lanka done at the request of UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon.

Prior to joining the Foundation, she was a member of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission in South Africa, serving first for three years as Deputy Chair to the Human Rights Violations Committee and then as the chair of the committee. She authored the final report of the TRC. During 2002 and 2004 she was appointed by the UN as an international commissioner for the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Sierra Leone.

She has consulted and assisted the governments of Ghana, Nepal, Afghanistan, Burundi, and Liberia in setting up truth commissions. Yasmin also serves on The Board of Trustees for Black Sash Trust, International Coalition of Historic Site Museums of Conscience, is Executive member for Niwano Peace Foundation as well as Advisory member for Leuven Centre for Global Governance Studies and Institute for International Law.


J. S. Tissainayagam

J. S. Tissainayagam

Advisory Council Member

“I am a Tamil from Sri Lanka who is a victim of State terror. For sustainable peace, all peoples in Sri Lanka should have the freedom to exercise their right to self-determination, nationhood and a homeland. I would like to contribute to realising that peace.”

J. S. Tissainayagam - Full Biography

worked in English-language national newspapers in Sri Lanka for over 20 years. In 2009 he was sentenced to 20 years imprisonment for writing critically of the Sri Lanka government. Released after 675 days in detention following an international campaign, he now lives in the US.

He was awarded the British Press Freedom Award – Foreign Journalist of the Year (2010) and the CPJ Press Freedom Award (2009). He was Nieman Fellow at Harvard and Reagan-Fascell Fellow at the National Endowment for Democracy.

He contributes to Foreign Policy, GlobalPost and Asian Correspondent. His article ‘Fear of Ethnic Reconciliation Reason for Post-War Censorship in Sri Lanka’ appears in the South Asia Review (Pub. University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown, Vol. XXXIII No.3 Jan 2013).


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